The Virtual Vitamin

A Daily Dose of Insight and Common Sense

In-N-Out vs. Sonic

The fast food philosophies couldn’t be farther apart.  It comes down to choice and whether or not you want to make one.  No one sits forever at In-N-Out unable to make a decision.  You can count the possible items on one hand.  Of course there are a few insider options for those who know the system, but their entire menu would be legible on a postage stamp.  Sonic’s menu could fill a billboard in 12 pt. font.  It has over 168,000 drink combinations, not including shakes and coffee drinks.  Breakfast is served all day and you can customize every combo, burger, coney, sandwich, wrap, salad, side order (way to many to list), or dessert.  You can run down a car battery with just the radio on well before you’ve read all the options (so there are lots of pictures).  This extraordinary country was founded on the principle of freedom.  Freedom comes from being able to make our own choices: on religion, political opinion, education, health care, and even what we eat.  Don’t get me wrong, I love In-N-Out, and would choose an In-N-Out burger over a Sonic burger every time, but I don’t always want a burger.  I’m glad I still live in a country where I have the power to make my own decisions, even if they are not always the best ones for me.  We need to encourage competition, reduce the red tape, and eliminate unconstitutional regulations that give preferences to or punish certain businesses or industries.  The consumer is smart enough to make the big (and little) decisions when given the choice.  Capitalism allows us to learn from our mistakes, rather than be restricted from making any.

Advertisements

January 25, 2011 Posted by | on Economics, on Government, on Life, on Society | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A War of Words

Whether spirited debate or healthy competition, passion emerges from the persistence of ideals.  It is crucial to remember that we have the option of raising our voices instead of raising our fists.  A constant battle of the minds was built into the framework of this country.  A continuous pursuit for truth, innovation, and equality has led iron to sharpen iron as ideas are debated.  In the heat of battle sometimes sparks fly.  The result has created this modern projected masterpiece, this city on a hill.  Discord can lead to discovery.  Metaphors that acknowledge the darkness of history, battles in our past, or life in the Wild West, serve a vital role in today’s rhetoric.  The internal struggle to define who we are will continue.  The fight for a better tomorrow will rage on.  We are in need of the constant reminders that the war can be waged with words.

January 24, 2011 Posted by | on Government, on Politics, on Society | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Power of Stuff

Having an economy based on consumption, funded by debt, and promoted by entitlements has turned this industrialized nation into one without industry.  The trade deficit is a manufacturing deficit, a debt of production.  America no longer makes anything, an exaggeration, of course, but one of proportional truth.  Public sector jobs now surpass production.  Service jobs exponentially out number manufacturing.  (Remember: every public sector job is a service job.)   While some services are a necessity, the spoiled “serve me” attitude will cause our success to lead to our failure.  We have taken the tangible for granted, placed value on the unnecessary, and forgotten how blessed we are as a nation.  The foundation of our economy has been chipped away by labor unions, shaken by government meddling, and demonized by an ungrateful workforce.  A quick lesson for those who demand that corporations, manufacturers, and small businesses act in good faith:  If you want a friend, be one — or jobs may become our only export.

November 5, 2010 Posted by | on Economics, on Government, on Society | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Candidate Catch 22

Those we need to run for political office are both honest and smart enough not to.  The electorate is desperate to back a candidate who doesn’t even want to be on the ballot.  They know the responsibility and sacrifice that comes with servant leadership and surrendered authority.  They value family, prior commitments, and making a difference where they are.  We are now pleading for those with the integrity and intelligence we need to represent us, to step out of their comfort zones and step up to the plate.   For those who seek truth above power.

May 31, 2010 Posted by | on Government, on Politics, on Society | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Don Your Day Pack

Formal instruction warps the senses, such as an image refracted in water.  But much may be gleaned from another’s perspective.  There is a difference between being taught and learning, group think and being able to think for one’s self.  Learning must be viewed through the clarity of personal responsibility.  Good students are shaped in homes, not classrooms.  They understand earning their education, without the expectation of entitlement.  To respect the value of anything, one must be willing to work for it.  Students must grasp the importance of truth and have a personal quest for it.   The mind is independent; knowledge is a solo hike.

May 30, 2010 Posted by | on Life, on Society | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Chocolate Frosted Sugar Bombs

The earmark culture in Washington brings out the kid in all of us, strapped into the shopping cart with all of the sugary cereals placed just within reach.  What we want taking priority over what we need.  We wait like children at the door asking, “What did you bring me?” $18.5 billion a year is spent on congressional pet projects to appease the voters.  With tantrums ensuing if our district isn’t getting what we feel is deserved.   We need to dismiss the cartoon endorsed packages for ones with true character and real substance.  It’s time to grow up and start buying cereal for its nutritional value, rather than the prize at the bottom of the box.

May 18, 2010 Posted by | on Government, on Politics, on Society | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Just Not Buying It

When walking onto a car lot, into an electronics store, or answering the door for someone carrying a list of magazine titles, people know that someone is trying to sell them something.  The strategy of this administration is to sell people on their far left agenda, even if the products they are selling are not wanted, needed, beneficial, or affordable to the American public.  It is more profitable to consider their temporary political capital than the tax payer.   Their priority is the commission, not the customer.  Are we smart enough not to fall for the urgency strategy, “call in the next ten minutes”?  Or the illusion of free, “just pay additional shipping and handling”?  Or that government is the only source for what we need, “not sold in stores”?  Over acting, half-truths, one-sided reviews, and two-dimensional aspects don’t keep the phone lines jammed at 3am.  Why does the same approach work on people who are fully awake?   It is time to close the door, hang up the phone, and vote out the politicians who are trying to sell us something.  It is time they learn that the customer is always right.

May 13, 2010 Posted by | on Government, on Politics, on Society | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

In the Name of Protest

Violence, vandalism, and verbal assaults are just a few of the indiscretions forgiven to protect the First Amendment.  But what rights do law-abiding citizens have under that same Constitution?  Do you have the right to infringe on another’s rights?  Does freedom of speech imply freedom of means?  Is method protected by protestors’ rights?  It was ruled in Oregon that riding bicycles naked was allowed because it was done as a protest.  The laws of indecent exposure were suspended due to freedom of speech.  The bare cyclists were not protesting clothing, they were against SUVs.  Are all laws subject to freedom?  Aren’t all crimes merely forms of expression, one person saying that their rights take priority over another’s?  What law could stand if personal liberties always took precedence?  

         Freedom is the right to be wrong… not do wrong. – John G. Diefenbaker

May 12, 2010 Posted by | on Government, on Society | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Are Stop Signs Merely Suggestions?

Were laws meant to be broken? What laws are okay to break?  Is it okay to go over the speed limit, cheat on taxes, use recreational drugs, download copyrighted media, or remain in the country illegally?  Is the law written in ink or sand?  What happens to a nation built on the rule of law when the law is not respected, even by those entrusted to uphold it?  Are we still a country of laws and not men, if men decide what laws to enforce?  Equal justice under the law does not discriminate.  Sympathy, political agendas, and subjective enforcement are unconstitutional.  It is not the right of executive or judicial powers to discriminate against legislation rightfully passed.  The separation of powers and the Constitution are for the protection of the people and the states.  Legislative representation acts as the voice of the people, and the people have spoken.

May 10, 2010 Posted by | on Government, on Politics, on Society | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wardrobe Malfunction

The content of my closet has altered over the years.  I have donated, sold, or tossed out items, that no longer fit my shape, size, taste, or lifestyle, and others have been purchased or handed down.  I am not the same person I was five, ten, or twenty years ago.  I have grown, changed roles, became a parent, and changed climates, but the reasons for what items hang in my closet have stayed constant.  I want to be comfortable, appropriate, confident, and not spend a fortune doing it.  My political viewpoint has shifted a lot like my wardrobe.  The more I learn, understand, and experience, the more I am forced to re-think my own position on issues.  The political realm also changes, the parties evolve, issues are re-prioritized, platforms shift.  It is imperative that we re-evaluate every now and then.  Doubt, debate, and deliberation clean out our mental closets.  It’s okay to admit you’ve grown, learned something, or started a new chapter in your life.  It may sound sacrilegious to most women, but to me political debate is like shopping.  I’m looking for what fits my beliefs, convictions, and intellect.  Most people probably spend more time contemplating what to wear than how to vote.  – So here is my political fashion advice: 

– The party line and straight tickets are never in style.  A one size fits all approach doesn’t work for clothes or ballots.

– Ask yourself, would you wear something just because it was in your parent’s or grandparent’s closet?

– Don’t invest a lot in trends, bank on your principles and convictions.

– Window shop, do a little research, know what you’re getting before you vote.  It is just as ridiculous and distasteful to show up at the polls naked as to cast an uninformed ballot.

May 9, 2010 Posted by | on Life, on Politics, on Society | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment